(Photo by Maggie O'Neill)

Thank You for Contacting the NYC Feral Cat Initiative

Thank you for caring about New York City’s feral and stray community cats! This page is intended to provide you with an immediate response with answers to some commonly asked questions and to share some resources that may be helpful to you. Your specific questions will be answered in a separate e-mail as soon as possible.

If you are a Certified TNR Caretaker, please send your inquiries to the dedicated e-mail address included in your monthly TNR Caretaker Update e-newsletter for priority service.

Are you concerned about the cats in your neighborhood?

Attending a Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) certification workshop is the first step you should take to gain the knowledge and skills needed to help the feral and stray community cats in your area. Upon completion of the workshop, you will become a Certified TNR Caretaker and be eligible for free spay/neuter, trap loans, transport of cats and traps, specialty training workshops, community outreach materials, cat food and straw giveawaysTNR Caretaker Update newsletter, networking opportunities, dedicated NYCFCI help desk, and other services and support within the five boroughs of New York City provided by the NYC Feral Cat Initiative of the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals, the ASPCA, and other area organizations.

Have you found newborn kittens?

During high kitten season in the spring and summer, it’s not unusual to discover a nest of unattended kittens or a single kitten seemingly abandoned by the mother. Before jumping to the rescue, consider the recommendations on our What to Do (and NOT Do) If You Find Newborn Kittens page.

Have you found a friendly cat or kitten?

If you have found a friendly cat, please file a Found Cat Report with Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC). You should also visit our Pet Lost & Found Resources page for more information on how to help reunite found cats with their families.

The NYC Feral Cat Initiative is not a shelter and therefore cannot take in cats and kittens for adoption placement. However, we do provide information to the public about shelters and rescue groups that might be able to assist you if you cannot provide foster care while you search for a permanent adoptive home for a cat you have found. For more information, please visit our How to Promote a Cat or Kitten for Adoption page.

Have you found a sick or injured cat or kitten?

If you have a cat or kitten in urgent need of medical care, please bring them to a veterinarian immediately. For more information and a list of emergency veterinary clinics listed by borough, please visit our 24-Hour Veterinary Hospitals & Emergency Rescue Information page. In New York City, you can also call 311 for emergency pick-up of a sick or injured stray animal.

Have you witnessed animal cruelty?

In New York City, animal cruelty cases are handled by the New York Police Department (NYPD). Please visit our How to Report an Animal Cruelty Crime page for details on how to report the abuse of community cats or other animals.

Other Inquiries

Please understand that the NYC Feral Cat Initiative of the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals (NYCFCI) is not a city agency or an animal shelter. We provide services and support for New York City Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) community members who have completed training as Certified TNR Caretakers. We can offer advice on the available options for all situations involving “community cats” living on the street, but we do not have resources to rescue, vet, tame, adopt, remove, or relocate cats and kittens. If you are interested in becoming a Certified TNR Caretaker, you can learn more and register on our TNR Certification Workshops page.

(Photo by Krista Menzel)
TNR Certification Workshops

Attending a Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) certification workshop is the first step you should take to gain the knowledge and skills needed to help the feral and stray community cats in your area. Upon completion of the workshop, you will become a Certified TNR Caretaker and be eligible for free and low-cost services and support in the five boroughs.

What to Do (and NOT Do) If You Find Newborn Kittens

During high kitten season in the spring and summer, it’s not unusual to discover a nest of unattended kittens or a single kitten seemingly abandoned by the mother. You want to help, right? Before jumping to the rescue, consider these recommendations.

(Photo by Dana Edelson)
How to Promote a Cat or Kitten for Adoption

The NYC Feral Cat Initiative is not a shelter and therefore cannot take in cats and kittens for adoption placement. However, we do provide information about shelters and rescue groups that might be able to assist you.

(Photo by GL Stock Images)
Emergency Veterinary Care

These veterinary hospitals and Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC) are able to provide emergency treatment for sick or injured stray and feral cats.

(Photo by Maureen Smith)
Community Cats & the Law

Learn aspects of the law that community cat caretakers should know about — particularly in New York City — and tips on how to work with law enforcement and community leaders to help ensure the safety and well-being of community cat colonies.

How to Report an Animal Cruelty Crime

Community cats are protected by the same anti-cruelty statutes that protect our pets from unjustified harm, pain, or suffering at the hands of a human. In New York City, animal cruelty cases are handled by the New York Police Department (NYPD).

TNR Organizations

If you would like to volunteer with a TNR organization in your neighborhood or need help with your trapping project, one of these local groups might be able to assist you.

(Photo by Krista Menzel)
Adopt a Rescued Cat or Kitten

During Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR), friendly stray cats and feral-born kittens young enough to be socialized are removed from colonies for adoption placement in indoor, forever homes.